Top Arrow
Free Demon Rias Scale Figure Only Comes With Anime Box Subscription

Yaoi Anime Every Fujoshi (or Fudanshi!) Has to Watch!

Classmates Gently Hold
Classmates Gently Hold

I know exactly how hard it is to find a good anime recommendation—especially when it’s Yaoi! But fret not—I’ve got a list just for you.

We're talking heartwarming slice-of-life moments, gut-wrenching dramas, and characters who defy expectations. Prepare to laugh, cry (happy tears!), and feel the electricity of gay love. *wags eyebrows*

Buckle up, fujoshis and fudanshis, because this list showcases the most absolutely must-watch Yaoi anime!

Umibe no Etranger

Umibe no Etranger - Shun and Mio kissing
Shun and Mio kissing

Shun is a novelist who finds peace writing by the sea. And like every other creative person, he’s pretty serious about his craft.

His life takes an unexpected turn when he meets Mio, a boy his age who often sits by the beach. Curious about Mio’s story (or probably because he’s looking for a muse), Shun decides to chat him up. But it's quite rare for Shun to do so, especially when he doesn’t normally talk to strangers.

They hang out more, and they talk. Eventually, Shun starts to loosen up around Mio. They share their dreams, stories, and all that deep stuff. But things get a bit complicated later.

Shun, you see, is dealing with some stuff – he's worried about what people might think of his sexuality. This is especially problematic in a small village like theirs, where word travels fast, and progressive ideals tend to be shunned.

But guess what? Fate has a funny way of working things out, and they wind up back at the beach where they first met. Crazy, right?

My Thoughts

Umibe no Etranger is a slow-burn story, but the character growth is amazing and worth the wait. Plus, the art and animation are just stunning!

If you're looking for a heartwarming BL anime movie with a realistic portrayal of love and self-discovery, grab a cup of tea, curl up by a window, and let Umibe no Étranger wash over you like a calming wave. You won't regret it!

Tropes You Can Find on Umibe no Etranger

  • Sunshine + Sunshine Protector: While not complete opposites, Shun and Mio have contrasting personalities. Shun is serious and reserved, while Mio seems more easygoing and open.
  • Internalized Homophobia: Shun grapples with his feelings for Mio, potentially struggling with societal expectations and internalized homophobia. This trope was handled subtly and adds a layer of realism to their challenges.
  • Slow Burn: Shun and Mio don’t immediately get together but learn to explore their feelings slowly.
  • Re-encounter: After a heartfelt confession, they separate for three years. This separation trope adds a layer of longing and allows them to reflect on their feelings. The eventual reunion adds a touch of fate and serendipity.
  • Non-traditional "uke" and "seme" dynamic: The roles seme and uke are often assigned based on looks. Whoever looks taller or stronger tops, while whoever looks smaller and submissive bottoms. Umibe No Etranger avoids this trope.

Given

Given - Mafuyu and Uenoyama sharing earphones in what looks like a train
Mafuyu and Uenoyama sharing earphones

Uenoyama Ritsuka is a ridiculously talented guitarist. But slowly, he finds himself losing his love for music as things start to get a bit boring and uninspiring.

Cue our lovable orange-head quiet boy, Mafuyu. Uenoyama finds him clinging to a broken guitar like a child would cling to their beloved stuffed toy. Feeling pity, he decides to help Mafuyu fix it. Then, out of nowhere (and honestly, the entire fandom would agree), Mafuyu starts singing.

Uenoyama is overwhelmed by what he hears. How could someone sound so soulful and raw? This reignites Ritsuka's spark for music, something he never thought would happen again.

Inspired by Mafuyu's voice and their unexpected connection, they decide to form a band with a couple of other guys. They practice, write music, the whole shebang.

My Thoughts

You’ve probably seen memes about Given rotating around the internet. If you’ve been spoiled, then you know what Mafuyu is dealing with, and boy, is it difficult. The burden of guilt he carries is unimaginable.

If you’re looking for a romance that happens in the first few episodes, then Given isn’t for you. The slow burn will slow burn, but the wait is worth it.

Tropes You Can Find on Given:

  • Bonding Through Shared Interest: Given heavily utilizes the trope of music acting as a bridge between characters and a method of emotional expression. Both Ritsuka and Mafuyu find solace and a way to connect with their feelings through music.
  • Tragic Backstory: Mafuyu harbors a past trauma that deeply affects him and his ability to sing.
  • Internalized Homophobia: Given explores the challenges of navigating LGBTQ+ identity, with Mafuyu potentially struggling with his own feelings and societal expectations.
  • Slow Burn Romance: The development of the relationship between Ritsuka and Mafuyu is gradual and subtle. This "slow burn" approach is a popular trope in BL stories.

Doukyuusei

Doukyuuseu - Rihito and Hikari kissing
Rihito Kisses HikaruMafuyu and Uenoyama sharing earphones

Rihito, the bookworm who could practically live inside a library, gets paired with Hikaru, the charming guitarist who seems to know everyone, for the dreaded high school chorus festival. Talk about an unlikely duo! Despite their completely different vibes, their shared love for music creates a spark.

As rehearsals turn into after-school hangouts, Rihito starts to loosen up under Hikaru's chill personality. He discovers another side to Hikaru, deeper than his good looks and guitar skills.

But their blossoming romance isn't all sunshine and rainbows. Rihito is dealing with new feelings and fear of rejection, while Hikaru's commitment issues may cause problems in their new relationship.

My Thoughts

Doukyuusei isn't afraid to show the real side of being gay in Japanese society. There's a fear of being outed, of disappointing expectations. But it also shows the strength that comes with finding someone who truly understands you.

Now, some folks might find the plot predictable: Boy meets boy, boy falls for boy, there are some cute misunderstandings, and then happily ever after. But honestly? That's the beauty of it.

Plus, the animation and art look amazing. It's like a movie watercolor painting you can't help but admire!

Tropes You Can Find on Doukyuusei:

  • Opposites Attract: Rihito, the studious and introverted student, is paired with Hikaru, the carefree and popular guitarist. Their contrasting personalities create initial tension but ultimately lead to a strong connection.
  • Forced Proximity: Being assigned as duet partners for the school chorus festival throws Rihito and Hikaru together, leading to increased interaction and the development of feelings.
  • First Love: Doukyuusei captures the innocence, awkwardness, and excitement of first love, with characters experiencing new emotions and navigating unfamiliar territory.
  • Secret Relationship: Depending on the interpretation, Rihito and Hikaru's relationship might face challenges due to societal expectations surrounding same-sex relationships, potentially leading to a secret romance element.

Got any anime movies or series you want to recommend? You can tell us more about it in the Otaku Community! It’s free and open to all anime lovers. Join us now!

Related Posts